Arizona Summit Law School sued the American Bar Association May 25 alleging its accreditation standards are arbitrary and unconstitutional, the fifth suit of its kind filed recently.

Three of the suits, including Summit’s, were filed by Infilaw, the company that owns the for-profit law schools.

Summit is asking the U.S. District Court for the District of Arizona to prevent the ABA from withdrawing its accreditation.

“Today’s filing alleges that the ABA has violated due process in applying its accreditation standards,” Paul D. Clement, an attorney with Kirkland & Ellis who is representing Summit, said in a statement.

Clement, a former solicitor general, is representing two other Infilaw schools, Charlotte School of Law and Florida Coastal School of Law, in similar suits against the ABA.

The ABA wouldn’t comment on pending litigation, but it provided a statement on accreditation from Barry Currier, managing director of ABA Accreditation and Legal Education.

“The ABA accreditation process provides meaningful opportunities for every law school to establish that it is operating in compliance with the accreditation standards. The vast majority of schools regularly do so,” the statement said.

To contact the reporter on this story: Melissa Heelan Stanzione in Washington at mstanzione@bloomberglaw.com

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Jessie Kokrda Kamens at jkamens@bloomberglaw.com