• Uber nemesis Shannon Liss-Riordan, the plaintiffs attorney who has also sued Starbucks, Harvard University, and American Airlines on behalf of their employees, now wants to run for U.S. Senator in Massachusetts as a Democrat. (American Lawyer)

  • President Donald Trump’s court fight to block the House’s subpoena for his financial records is apparently going to the D.C. Circuit Court, whose chief judge is Merrick Garland. (National Law Journal) (New York Magazine)

  • The Labor Department promoted lawyer Molly Conway to chief of staff, where she will succeed Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta’s controversial outgoing adviser, Nicholas Geale, starting June 1. According to Conway’s LinkedIn, she graduated American University Washington College of Law, and, early in her career was a legislative assistant at Drinker Biddle for a year. Conway currently serves as Acosta’s deputy chief of staff and will remain in her dual role as the acting head of the DOL’s Employment and Training Administration. (BLAW)

  • The former patent office litigation practice co-chair at Knobbe Martens, Michelle Armond, has left the California-based intellectual property and tech law firm to start a new boutique with Texas-based IP trial attorney Doug Wilson. The new firm, Armond Wilson, which specializes in patent reviews and appeals, officially opens today with offices in Irvine, California, and Austin, Texas. (BLAW)

  • Willkie Farr & Gallagher is advising Aegerion Pharmaceuticals, Inc., wholly owned subsidiary of Vancouver, Canada-based biopharmaceutical company Novelion Therapeutics Inc., which, in a court-supervised Chapter 11 re-capitalization process, agreed to a transaction in which Aegerion will become a wholly owned subsidiary of, Dublin-based Amryt Pharma Plc. Goodwin Procter and Norton Rose Fulbright Canada advised Novelion. Latham & Watkins and King & Spalding advised the ad hoc group of convertible noteholders. (GlobeNewswire.com)

  • The National Rifle Association’s internal squabbles and legal problems have piled on the work for the NRA’s longtime top lawyer, John Frazer, and his team. (Corporate Counsel)

  • Over 200 company top lawyers have signed on to an initiative to push for diversity at law firms, launched by Michelle Fang, the chief legal officer at car-sharing company Turo. Fang recently released a set of strategies for general counsel who want to promote diversity. (Corporate Counsel)

  • Troutman Sanders added securities attorney Genna Garver as a partner in New York. She arrives from Dorsey & Whitney, where she chaired the firm’s investment management practice. (Troutman.com)

Lawyers, Law Firms

  • Special counsel Robert Mueller is balking at testifying publicly before Congress, pushing for a closed-door appearance in negotiations with House Democrats. (BN via BLAW)

Deals

  • Dallas-based Haynes and Boone represented Stream Energy in the sale of its retail electricity and natural gas business to Baker Botts client NRG Energy Inc. for $300 million plus working capital. (HaynesBoone.com) (UtilityDive.com)

  • Sidley Austin client Texas Pacific Land Trust filed a lawsuit in Texas federal court against “dissident nominee” Eric L. Oliver for alleged violations of securities laws. The suit stems from a proxy contest that Oliver initiated to be elected as a trustee of Texas Pacific Land trust, the company’s press release said. (SeekingAlpha.com) (BusinessWire.com)

  • DLA Piper represented New Signature, a Washington-based Microsoft cloud technologies provider, during its acquisition of Nebbia Technology, an Orlando, Florida-based consultancy focused on solutions on Microsoft’s Azure platform. (PRNewswire.com) (DLAPiper.com)

Laterals, Moves, Promotions

  • Willkie added veteran energy industry compliance attorney Jay Martin as senior counsel in its Houston office. Martin arrives from global oilfield services provider Baker Hughes, where he was associate general counsel and chief compliance officer. As of December 2018, Baker Hughes is a GE company. (Willkie.com)

  • Chicago-based Sidley Austin expanded its private equity practice at Cooley’s expense, adding partner Eric Kauffman and associate Stacy Crosnicker, as well additional associates, its latest lateral hires from the California firm. The group is a part of a larger team led by longtime Cooley partner Mehdi Khodadad, who joined Sidley back in April alongside partner Joshua DuClos. (BLAW via BLB)

  • Michael Best added intellectual property partner Arimi Yamada in the firm’s IP group in Washington. With a focus on IP and patent matters for Japanese businesses with operations in the U.S., Yamada will be joined by four IP professionals from her former firm, Typha IP LLP, where she was a founding partner. (MichaelBest.com)

  • Management-side worklaw firm Littler hired back attorney Jeremy D. Sosna as a shareholder in its Minneapolis office. Littler said Sosna was the first associate hired in its Minneapolis office and was at the firm from 1998 to 2003. He arrives from Maslon LLP. (Littler)

  • Quarles & Brady got back energy attorney Christopher Skey in its energy, environmental and natural resources practice group as a partner in its Chicago office. Skey, who was at Quarles & Brady from 2012 to 2016, returns from Clark Hill, where he was a Chicago-based partner. (Quarles.com)

  • Reed Smith said film and TV production finance lawyer Christian Simonds joined the firm as a New York-based partner in its entertainment + media industry group. Simonds was recently a partner at Gray Krauss Sandler Des Rocher. (ReedSmith.com)

  • Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough said litigator Thurman W. Zollicoffer Jr., who is a former Baltimore city solicitor and counsel for the mayor and city council for the City of Baltimore, is joining the firm as a partner in the city, arriving from Whiteford Taylor Preston. Litigators Danielle G. Marcus and Peter W. Sheehan Jr. are making the move from that firm with him, joining as partners. (NelsonMullins.com)

Legal Actions, Bankruptcies, Decisions

  • The Chinese woman accused of illegally entering President Trump’s Mar-a-Lago resort told a judge she wants to dump her legal team and represent herself, according to a report. (Miami Herald)